The first rule of gunfighting is “Bring enough guns”

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38th Bomb group, 71st Bomb Squadron

Ground crew member posing next to a B-25 strafer (J model?) and it’s 14 .50 cals.

When there is lead in the air, there is hope in the heart

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We’ve been fishing all day

And all we caught was this Kingfisher.  And some netting…

os2u-kingfisher-aircraft-being-recovered-by-battleship-uss-texas-off-iwo-jima-at-1700-on-16-feb-1945-note-netting-of-recovery-sled-hooked-on-pontoons-recovery-hook

OS2U Kingfisher aircraft being recovered by battleship USS Texas, off Iwo Jima, at 1700 on 16 Feb 1945; note netting of recovery sled hooked on pontoon’s recovery hook
Source United States National Archives Identification Code 80-G-309140

The Same Places, 70+ Years Apart—Six More WWII Bases Then and Now

Rabaul, New Britain

Located on the coast of a natural harbor on the eastern coast of New Britain, an island in the Southwest Pacific, Rabaul was a German colony in the 1900s that was captured by the Australians in World War I. Two nearby volcanoes, Vulcan and Tavurvur, erupted violently in 1937, destroying most of the city. After World War II started, it was captured by the Japanese in January 1942, after which it was transformed into a major stronghold with approximately 97,000 troops that would easily fend off Allied attacks until October and November 1943. While the Allies continued to advance towards Japan, they cut off Japanese supply routes to Rabaul and continued to bomb the city and surrounding area. It was officially surrendered at the end of the war. After the war was over, the city became a trading hub until Tavurvur erupted in 1994, once again destroying a large part of the city. Developments closest to the volcano were never rebuilt.

Source: The Same Places, 70+ Years Apart—Six More WWII Bases Then and Now