Not so bonza Ghostrider, the pattern is full

The Australian counterparts to Maverick and Iceman.  Or would that be Icebloke?

Source: Melbourne hawks in review

Here we see a pair of McDonnell Douglas A4G Skyhawks of the Royal Australian Navy Fleet Air Arm 805 Squadron (VF-805) coming in low and hot over the RAN’s only operable aircraft carrier of the time, HMAS Melbourne (R21) sometime in the 1970s.

While the RAN FAA traces its lineage back to the Great War, it was only after WWII that it was able to stand up fixed-wing carrier squadrons, flying Hawker Sea Fury’s in Korea. After a brief interlude in Sea Venoms, 805 Squadron picked up their Seahawks in 1968.

The two ‘Hawks shown above were part of 21 A-4s operated by the RAN between 1967-84 with #887 eventually transferring to New Zealand from where she was sold in 2012 to Draken International (where she still flies as a contract aggressor in Florida). As for #888, she crashed in 1979 but her pilot, a U.S. Navy aviator on exchange duty, was rescued.

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A-26 Invader doing it’s thing 20+ years after WWII

a-26a_609sos_near_nkp_1969

USAF – Scan from Dana Bell, Air War over Vietnam, Volume IV. Arms and Armour Press, London, Harrisburg (PA), 1984, ISBN 0853686351, p. 62. Cites U.S. Air Force as source.A USAF Douglas/On Mark A-26A Invader of the 609th Special Operations Squadron near Nakhon Phanom Royal Thai Air Force Base, sometime between 1967 and 1969. The B-26K 64-17645 (ex A-26C 44-35546) was rebuilt by On Mark as a B-26K, and used by the CIA in the Congo from 1964 to December 1966 with tail code ‘RF645’, later ‘FR-645’. In August 1967, following redesignation as A-26A, it arrived in South-East Asia, and on 10 November 1969 was turned over from the USAF to the South Vietnamese Air Force. In March 1975, it was blown up at Nha Trang to prevent it from falling into North Vietnamese hands.