Consolidated B-24H Liberator: Citizen Soldier’s Armor. — The Dreamy Dodo

An aircrew of the 455th Bombardment Group, 743rd Bomb Squadron (15th AF) standing in front of the B-24H Liberator “TePee Time Gal” at San Giovanni Airfield (Foggia), Italy, 1944-45.
He -according to some sources it’s Major David G. Bellemere- is wearing a sample of typical late-WW2 clothing. Of interest are the M-2 armor vest (used by “armor-seated” crews), M-3 armor apron and M-3 flak helmet- that helmet was worn over an A-11 helmet, B-8 goggles and A-14 oxygen mask. Our friend shows his healthy individualism with those neat 1940 Pattern RAF boots.
The Americans, as usual, always overkill with any kind of gear. Better safe than sorry.

Photo: USAAF.

via Consolidated B-24H Liberator: Citizen Soldier’s Armor. — The Dreamy Dodo

A Zombie that Almost Lived up to its Name

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The 64th Squadron struck the Ring Ring coconut plantation near Gasmata, New Britain on November 24, 1943. On the way home, Henry J. Domagalski and crew, in the B-24D #42-40913, ZOMBIE, were attacked over the Dampier Strait by 12 Japanese Zeros.

For a short time in November 1943, the 43rd Bomb Group was flying missions to a Ring Ring, a coconut plantation near Gasmata. Although these weren’t the most exciting missions, the area was being prepared for a December ground invasion, which made the mission necessary. It was observed in the 43rd’s Group History that, “Our combat crews don’t seem to think much of this type of target, preferring to hit something that will blow up with a loud noise and a satisfactory amount of flame and smoke, but the Army seems quite pleased with the results of our bombing and apparently considers the destruction of these targets essential.”

Flying from Port Moresby to Ring Ring on November 24th was 1/Lt. Henry J. Domagalski and his crew in their B-24 nicknamed ZOMBIE. Their mission was an armed reconnaissance to the area, with the crew running into no trouble as ZOMBIE’s bombs were unloaded over Garove Island. As the B-24 flew over the Dampier Strait, the crew encountered a formation of nine Japanese “Lily” bombers accompanied by 12 “Oscar” fighters returning to Wewak from a mission to Finschhafen.

Head over to A Zombie that Almost Lived up to its Name for [Paul Harvey]the rest of the story. Gooood day![/Paul Harvey]

White phosphorus bombs against B-24 raid

http://www.worldwarphotos.info/wp-content/gallery/usa/aircrafts/b-24/USAAF_B-24_Liberator_over_Japan_struck_down_by_Japanese_Phoshphorus_Bomb.jpg

USAAF B-24 Liberator over Japan struck down by Japanese Phosphorus Bomb

One of the more unusual tactics used by the Japanese against US air raids was dropping white phosphorus bombs in the midst of a bomber group.  Despite the caption I don’t see a “struck down” B-24, just bursts from Willie Pete.

Large by Huge resolution here: http://www.worldwarphotos.info/wp-content/gallery/usa/aircrafts/b-24/USAAF_B-24_Liberator_over_Japan_struck_down_by_Japanese_Phoshphorus_Bomb.jpg

Here’s a similar picture and the source:

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