The Webley-Fosbery Automatic Revolver

A semi-automatic revolver is something I’ve been fascinated by ever since I got a copy of Ian V Hogg’s Complete Illustrated Encyclopedia of the World’s Firearms somewhere around 7th or 8th grade. 

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I lugged that book around in my book bag for almost the entire school year and tried to read through it anytime I had a free moment.  This was in the mid-80s so no SWAT teams were called out because a kid had a gun book at school.  Considering the books and magazines I carried and read at school (no porn!) I can only imagine how many suspensions I would have racked up today but I digress…

As usual, Ian at Forgotten Weapons gets to play with the coolest things

 

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81 years ago today – T.E. Lawrence

6 days after coming off his Brough Superior motorcycle in a crash while avoiding two boys bicycling on a road T.E. Lawrence, aka Emir Dynamite for his skill in railroad and bridge demolition dies, never having regained consciousness.

Here’s a very good article worth checking out: The True Story of Lawrence of Arabia

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Happy New Year!

May the new one be even better than the one just ended…

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Accompanied by their pipers, Scottish troops congregate outside their huts to cheer and raise their bonnets on New Years Day. Dressed in their kilts and Tam O’Shanter hats, these soldiers would have been resting in billet huts behind the front line. The wooden platforms that were used to bridge the mud and puddles between the huts can also be seen. It is highly likely that this image would have been used in an attempt to raise morale back in the UK. Publishing photographs of happy, smiling soldiers while they are on leave from the trenches and during the festive period, would have established the sort of unquestioning climate desired by the authorities. [Original reads: ‘BRITISH OFFICIAL PHOTO FROM THE WESTERN FRONT. Happy Scottish troops on New Year’s Day.’]

Combat Gallery Sunday: The Martial Art of James Arthur Pownall

From the great laststandonzombieisland

Much as once a week I like to take time off to cover warships (Wednesdays), on Sundays (when I feel like working), I like to cover military art and the painters, illustrators, sculptors, photographers and the like that produced them.

Combat Gallery Sunday: The Martial Art of James Arthur Pownall

Not much is known of James Arthur Pownall, coming from the landed gentry and born in to a family of cotton merchants. Pownall apparently eschewed work in the cotton concern to take up painting full time.

A Mounted Sowar in Drab Full Dress, Guides Cavalry, James Arthur Pownall, 1902, National Army Museum.  Note the Martini rifle while the rest of the empire was going Lee-Metford. The Corps of Guides was raised in 1846/1847 by Lieutenant (later Lieutenant-General Sir) Harry Lumsden (1821–1896). In 1886, as part of the later nineteenth-century reform of the Indian Army, the Guides were transferred from the control of the Governor of the Punjab to that of the Commander-in-Chief. The cavalry regiment was later numbered 10th in the 1922 reorganization of the Indian Army.

Indian Corps of Drums,1918, James Arthur Pownall, Cheshire Military Museum

Mounted Lancer, James Arthur Pownall, 1918, Cheshire Military Museum

Source: Combat Gallery Sunday: The Martial Art of James Arthur Pownall