How about some random B-24 goodness?

Just because…

National Archives and Records Administration of the USA

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Over Graz, Austria 1944

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Tragedy Above the Bismarck Sea


On February 26, 1943, a Japanese convoy was spotted by Allied forces at Rabaul. At this point in the war, the Japanese were trying to build up their strength in New Guinea after losing control of the Solomon Islands. Fifth Air Force would try to keep a close eye on this convoy, but due to the weather, could not watch it for two days. On March 1st, the weather finally cleared up enough for a 90th Bomb Group crew to see the convoy on its way from Rabaul to Lae. The crew immediately reported the situation as well as the size of the convoy. With six troop transports, two vessels carrying aviation fuel, a boat full of Japanese marines, eight destroyer escorts, and 100 fighter planes, this was not a target to be missed. B-17s from the 63rd Squadron were soon sent to bomb the convoy, but were thwarted by weather. That night, 1/Lt. William Crawford, Jr.’s crew set off to find and monitor the convoy while Fifth Air Force got ready to attack.

Read the rest here: Tragedy Above the Bismarck Sea

Consolidated B-24H Liberator: Citizen Soldier’s Armor. — The Dreamy Dodo

An aircrew of the 455th Bombardment Group, 743rd Bomb Squadron (15th AF) standing in front of the B-24H Liberator “TePee Time Gal” at San Giovanni Airfield (Foggia), Italy, 1944-45.
He -according to some sources it’s Major David G. Bellemere- is wearing a sample of typical late-WW2 clothing. Of interest are the M-2 armor vest (used by “armor-seated” crews), M-3 armor apron and M-3 flak helmet- that helmet was worn over an A-11 helmet, B-8 goggles and A-14 oxygen mask. Our friend shows his healthy individualism with those neat 1940 Pattern RAF boots.
The Americans, as usual, always overkill with any kind of gear. Better safe than sorry.

Photo: USAAF.

via Consolidated B-24H Liberator: Citizen Soldier’s Armor. — The Dreamy Dodo

A-26 Invader doing it’s thing 20+ years after WWII

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USAF – Scan from Dana Bell, Air War over Vietnam, Volume IV. Arms and Armour Press, London, Harrisburg (PA), 1984, ISBN 0853686351, p. 62. Cites U.S. Air Force as source.A USAF Douglas/On Mark A-26A Invader of the 609th Special Operations Squadron near Nakhon Phanom Royal Thai Air Force Base, sometime between 1967 and 1969. The B-26K 64-17645 (ex A-26C 44-35546) was rebuilt by On Mark as a B-26K, and used by the CIA in the Congo from 1964 to December 1966 with tail code ‘RF645’, later ‘FR-645’. In August 1967, following redesignation as A-26A, it arrived in South-East Asia, and on 10 November 1969 was turned over from the USAF to the South Vietnamese Air Force. In March 1975, it was blown up at Nha Trang to prevent it from falling into North Vietnamese hands.