Daimler-Benz DB 602 (LOF-6) V-16 Diesel Airship Engine

By William Pearce

Around 1930, Daimler-Benz* developed the F-2 engine, initially intended for aviation use. The F-2 was a 60 degree, supercharged, V-12 engine with individual cylinders and overhead camshafts. The engine had a 6.50 in (165 mm) bore and an 8.27 in (210 mm) stroke. The F-2’s total displacement was 3,288 cu in (53.88 L), and it had a compression ratio of 6.0 to 1. The engine produced 800 hp (597 kW) at 1,500 rpm and 1,000 hp (746 kW) at 1,700 rpm. The engine was available with either direct drive or a .51 gear reduction, and weighed around 1,725 lb (782 kg). It is unlikely that the Daimler-Benz F-2 powered any aircraft, but it was used in a few speed boats.

The rest of the story: Daimler-Benz DB 602 (LOF-6) V-16 Diesel Airship Engine

The First Ruger


In doing some research for the “From the Editor” for the September issue, I spent some time looking at William Batterman Ruger’s first contribution to American Rifleman, and no it wasn’t his “.22 Ruger Pistol” that made its debut in a September 1949 advertisement, nor was it Technical Editor Julian S. Hatcher’s extremely favorable review of “two production-line samples of the .22 Ruger” that ran in November 1949.

No, the first Ruger in the magazine was an article written by the young inventor in December 1943, at a time when he was working on a machine gun design for the U.S. Ordnance Dept. Titled “Semi-Automatic .250-3000,” Ruger detailed the conversion of a Savage Model 99 from a lever-action to a gas-operated semi-automatic, noting “This conversion can be accomplished with only superficial changes in a few of the parts.” Even in this first gun, aesthetics mattered to the young inventor: “The rotary type magazine has adequate capacity and does not require projections on the exterior of the gun.” Of course, some of those features would be seen in Ruger’s later designs, especially a flush-fitting rotary magazine.

Read the rest here: The First Ruger

I NEED one of these!

Racing goggles and helmet not included…

escacar-1945-gyroscopic-rocket-car-paleo-future

Escacar Unicycle Gyroscopic Rocket Car

Carl H. Renner painted this “Escacar” for General Motors in 1945. The Escacar is described as a “Unicycle Gyroscopic Rocket Car.”

Like the painting of a commuter helicopter we looked at a few months ago, this image can be found in the Petersen Automotive Museum book, Driving Through Futures Past.

 

via: http://paleo-future.blogspot.com/2007/07/gyroscopic-rocket-car-1945.html

Heads-up for hydrocarbon heritage

Castrol racing livery ranks in my top favorite racing liveries of all time.  The old Gulf blue and orange is my number 1 with the others shuffling up and down as the mood hits me.  The Marlboro Ferraris, the John Player Specials, The Ramchargers, The Blue Max, the Hot Wheels Snake and Mongoose…OK I’ll shuffle off and be old now….


BP-Castrol’s return to Formula 1 as a partner to McLaren-Honda has been announced. This news has got the F1 community rather excited – let’s face it, any new sponsor announcement is a novelty in F1 these days – but it’s perfectly simple and logical step to have taken.Castrol is arguably the most prolific partner to motor manufacturers in competition, attached to Ford in GT racing, V8 Supercars and the World Rally Championship; Volkswagen Group in the World Endurance Championship, World Rally Championship*, World Rallycross Championship, German Touring Car Championship and European Rally Championship; Volvo in the World and Swedish Touring Car Championships and Kia in Global Rallycross.

More here: Heads-up for hydrocarbon heritage

The Smith & Wesson Model 25-5

Even though I prefer the 4″ N Frames, my 6″ 25-5 is a joy to spend range time with…

Gunner's Journal

The S&W model 25-5 is one of those revolvers that has gained classic status along with most of the other “N” frame S&W’s made before the lawyer proofing started with those darn framelocks that everyone loves to hate myself included.
A couple of years ago you could buy about any older S&W revolver for very little money but these days people have come to realize that these wonderful revolvers are something special and prices have increased accordingly. Most any S&W “K” frame will sell in the $450 to $500 range with “N” frames at $600 plus depending on how rare they are. I recently saw a nickel 6 inch 41 magnum marked at just under $1000! A word to the wise if you have one keep it!
My journey with the S&W “N” frame started in 1976. At that time the model 29 was the revolver to buy. Barrel length…

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