Looking for your own private air force?

I’m in for $20, maybe $30 if there’s some overtime on the next check…

Provided you have the cash to spare, you can get one heck of a deal on a whole squadron of preowned jet trainers, as-is, where-is.

“Awesome deal. Package of 20 upgraded Fougas with 830,000 parts. Owner wants them sold this week. Only $200K for everything!” reads the post at Raptor Aviation of Port St. Lucie, Florida.

Read the rest here: Looking for your own private air force?

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The long walk back from Chihuahua

100 years ago today, the end of the Punitive Expedition:

In the image above, a column of 6th and 16th Infantry regiments, are shown en route back to the States, between Corralitos Rancho and Ojo Federico, Jan 29th, 1917. Co. A, 16th Inf. in the foreground. Note the “Montana” campaign hats and Springfield 1903s.

Read the rest here: The long walk back from Chihuahua

Just Jeepin’ around Geilenkirchen

A jeep manned by Sergeant A Schofield and Trooper O Jeavons of 1 SAS near Geilenkirchen in Germany Nov 1944. The jeep is armed with three Vickers ‘K’ guns (2 double and 1 single mount), and fitted with armoured glass shields in place of a windscreen. The SAS were involved at this time in clearing snipers in the 43rd Wessex Division area. No 5 Army Film & Photographic Unit Hewitt (Sgt)IWM Colourised by Paul Reynolds

via laststandonzombieisland: Just Jeepin’ around Geilenkirchen

“That’s not gone well” Thursday

“I thought we were empty nesters?” edition

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A playful Russian Bébé. Regrettably, I’m not sure if this “well-nested” Nieuport was an 11 or a 16. Only minor and subtle differences between the two models and the Russian played quite a bit with their aircraft.

Via: The Dreamy DodoNieuport 11/16 Bébé: “Did I Do That? (IV)”

75 years ago this month

It’s 35 degrees Fahrenheit this morning (it feels like a balmy 40 degrees in the shop) and we’re supposed to have flurries Friday morning.  My blood is too thin for this so here’s a picture to remind me it could always be colder and wetter.  I feel sure the North Atlantic in January qualifies…

U-Boot U-123 in See

The forward gun crew of U-123 prepare to engage a surface vessel sometime in January 1942.

U-Boot U-123 in See

This view from the conning tower of U-123 shows their intended victim in the distance.

via: http://ww2today.com/

More on U-123

Happy New Year!

May the new one be even better than the one just ended…

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Accompanied by their pipers, Scottish troops congregate outside their huts to cheer and raise their bonnets on New Years Day. Dressed in their kilts and Tam O’Shanter hats, these soldiers would have been resting in billet huts behind the front line. The wooden platforms that were used to bridge the mud and puddles between the huts can also be seen. It is highly likely that this image would have been used in an attempt to raise morale back in the UK. Publishing photographs of happy, smiling soldiers while they are on leave from the trenches and during the festive period, would have established the sort of unquestioning climate desired by the authorities. [Original reads: ‘BRITISH OFFICIAL PHOTO FROM THE WESTERN FRONT. Happy Scottish troops on New Year’s Day.’]